Home Adventure Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

by Ifunanya
Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

 

Badagry is such a beautiful and calm place, it is easy to forget that you are still in Lagos. The old town is known for its beautiful coastline beach and historical significance. Last weekend I got a chance to take walk through history.

Armed with a very knowledgeable tour guide, we got to explore The Chief Mobee Royal Family Original Slave Relic Museum, Seriki Faremi Williams Slave Museum and the Badagary Slave Route. I also got a chance to see the first storey building in Nigeria

I got to learn a lot about the history and the role of the town during the slave trade. Especially the oral history that has been passed down over the years by the people of Badagry. I have a put together a short narrative video of my trip and you can find it here.

The Visuals….

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

Our first stop was The Chief Mobee Family Museum

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade RouteA display of some of the chains and bounds the slaves where forced to wear for 18 hours everyday while the worked.

The chains that go around the neck is so heavy, I couldn’t lift it with one hand

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

Water container the slaves had to drink out of.
Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

 

 

A painting of the famous Asisoe tin, where Christianity was preached for the first time

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

During the slave trade era, a canon of this size was exchanged for up to 100 slaves

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade RouteOutside Seriki Faremi Williams Abass’ compoundExploring Badagry || The Slave Trade RouteExploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The entrance walls of Seriki Abass” compounds are lined with slave trade era memorabilia

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade RouteOutside the first storey building in Nigeria, built in 1845. Originally built as a mission house for the first missionaries.

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

Photo of Bishop Crowther from inside the house. The mission house is where he translated the English bible to Yoruba language Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade RouteHeading to the point of no return

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

The halfway mark. Also the well from which the slaves were forced to drink. It is said that the well contained concoctions which caused the slaves short term memory loss and made them docile. Making it easier for them to be shipped off.

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route
Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

 

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

Point of no return….for the slavesExploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

This is a walking distance of about 20-30 mins.
Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route
Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

And from here the slaves would be shipped off, never to be seen again.

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

The beach at badagry is amazing. I took a minute to splash around in the clean salt waterExploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route

I thoroughly enjoyed my visit, our tour guide was super friendly and patient. He waited while we took unending photos and made videos.  The only real problem I had was DISTANCE.

Y’all, badagry is far. I am talking about 67Km from Ikeja (according to Google map) and the roads leading up to the town are not in the best condition. My advice is; leave home as early as possible.

The journey was long and tiring and all the way I swore I would never go back. But now that I am calm, I honestly cant wait to go back there. Plus I just learnt that there is a whispering palms and other attractions.

Now about cost, I must say it was a bit more expensive than I had originally budgeted. Entrance fee for each site was N500/ person. The cost of the boat ride and tour of the point of no return was N2000/person.

Meaning it cost a total of N3500/person for all tours

A few tips:

I didn’t know this at the time but I have been told that the costs for all tour sites are actually negotiable, make sure to bargain accordingly

Please remember there is a bit of walking involved, there were no other means of transporting for tourist to get to the point of no return. Prepare accordingly.

Remember you are going to the seaside, the sun is going to be really scorching. If you have a sensitivity to the sun please carry a sunscreen or dress accordingly.

You will also need to stay hydrated be sure to bring drinks with you there are limited options for drinks.

Exploring Badagry || The Slave Trade Route Badagry town

If  you have any questions or comments about the arena, if you are planning a visit and need more information please leave a comment or send an email to hello@sunlightdreamer.com and I will be sure to assist you any way I can.

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9 comments

Dubem October 4, 2017 - 8:18 pm

That’s nice thanks for the info. I and my family will come visit this museum

Reply
Seye Kuyinu October 5, 2017 - 3:24 am

I love how you broke this down. Now you make me want to go…but you didn’t write about how to get to Badagry. Like how much left your pocket from the time you left your house to when you got back to ‘real life’?

Reply
Ifunanya October 5, 2017 - 11:02 am

Oh wow. Thanks a lot, I guess I really didn’t think to include that. Well people will be coming from all over. But here is mine:
Oshodi to Mile 2 N150(bus)
Mile 2 to Badagry roundabout N400(bus)
Badagry roundabout to museum N100(bike)
So I guess it cost about N650 to get to the museum from Oshodi.

Thank you for pointing it out….xxx

Reply
Dominika October 5, 2017 - 3:49 pm

Ifunaya, wow it looks like you are a very cheerful person. To really had fun at Badagry. You told the story perfectly and I almost felt that it was a real life slave trade movie. I have visited Badagry beach once but unfortunately I went with a bunch of acquaintances that I wasn’t used to so I couldn’t really loose my guard in the beach. I look forward to going there again, but with friends soon. BTW. Girl you are my realest MVP for always visiting my blog and leaving comments, thank you so much. Please we should follow each other on instagram @dazzle_and_gorgeous and I will be sure to follow back.

Reply
Ifunanya October 5, 2017 - 4:40 pm

It’s a shame you didn’t get to let loose when you visited the beach. I really hope you get another chance to go back there. The beach is too amazing not to enjoy. They literally had to pull me out of the water 😂😂😂
I try to have fun wherever I am girl. You only live once after all.

Thanks for stopping by…xxx

P/S: I just followed you on the gram 😊

Reply
Desire Uba October 8, 2017 - 11:19 pm

I love the way you told the story and the pictures are really detailed.
I used to think of Badagry as a place for ‘excursion’ but you really changed my mind.
It really looks like a great place to visit.
Thank you for sharing!
http://www.desireuba.wordpress.com

Reply
Heather Rowland October 13, 2017 - 4:21 pm

This was such an interesting read. Beautiful photography – I’d love to visit here sometime in the future.

Heather xx
https://www.hefafa.me.uk

Reply
Princess October 19, 2017 - 1:09 am Reply
Gift Collins October 27, 2017 - 12:23 am

Now you make me sad that all through I loved in Lagos I missed out on this beautiful town with lots and lots of history.

Love your post

Hope you are good…. Noticed I haven’t seen any activity from you and thought to check.

Stay beautiful

Reply

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